Commentaries

PMC Market Commentary: June 27, 2014

A Macro View – Challenged Growth

It was another placid week for financial markets. In most walks of life, that would be just fine, but for Wall Street, it seemingly only added to anxiety. The low, low levels of volatility and risk (as measured by the Volatility Index, or VIX) has triggered a new round of questioning whether we are in an analogous period to 2007, when volatility also plunged but only as a prelude to the near-financial collapse. The Financial Times has run a series of pieces warning that we may be entering a similar phase, most recently with a piece entitled Tranquil Markets Are Enjoying Too Much of a Good Thing.

Are they? The beauty and peril of historical analogies is that you never know if they fit until they do. Today’s levels of complacency may be like 2007 in that they are masking real structural problems, or complacency may be merited by the absence of similar structural problems. It would be foolish to overlook today’s challenges, from weak job creation and jobs created that pay too little to the challenge of invigorating the growth engine of the world’s most developed and affluent economies. But that is not the same as structural fissures that will unwind in a jarring crisis.

This past week reminded us of just how challenged growth remains, with U.S. GDP for the first quarter revised down again, this time to a cringe-worthy negative 2.9%. Many factors, from the much-blamed weather to how inventories were finally assessed, went into that decline, and most economists and investors are expecting a sharp bounce-back in the second quarter. Still, the number, however provisional and limited as all these numbers are, pointed to the reality that we are likely in a new and more difficult economic normal that will not see an easy return to the levels of growth that so many Americans accustomed to the mid-20th century expect.

Nonetheless, even with the question of growth and its level unresolved, there would appear to be good reasons for the lack of market fear. Yes, and yes, and yes, bad things might happen, ranging from geopolitical uncertainties (yesterday in Ukraine, today in Iraq, tomorrow who knows) to black pools in the financial markets to too much easy money. But this may be a summer where stability and not volatility rules the day.

Download the full PDF

The information, analysis, and opinions expressed herein are for general and educational purposes only. Nothing contained in this weekly review is intended to constitute legal, tax, accounting, securities, or investment advice, nor an opinion regarding the appropriateness of any investment, nor a solicitation of any type. All investments carry a certain risk, and there is no assurance that an investment will provide positive performance over any period of time. An investor may experience loss of principal. Investment decisions should always be made based on the investor’s specific financial needs and objectives, goals, time horizon, and risk tolerance. The asset classes and/or investment strategies described may not be suitable for all investors and investors should consult with an investment advisor to determine the appropriate investment strategy. Past performance is not indicative of future results.

Information obtained from third party sources are believed to be reliable but not guaranteed. Envestnet|PMC™ makes no representation regarding the accuracy or completeness of information provided herein. All opinions and views constitute our judgments as of the date of writing and are subject to change at any time without notice.

Investments in smaller companies carry greater risk than is customarily associated with larger companies for various reasons such as volatility of earnings and prospects, higher failure rates, and limited markets, product lines or financial resources. Investing overseas involves special risks, including the volatility of currency exchange rates and, in some cases, limited geographic focus, political and economic instability, and relatively illiquid markets. Income (bond) securities are subject to interest rate risk, which is the risk that debt securities in a portfolio will decline in value because of increases in market interest rates. Exchange Traded Funds (ETFs) are subject to risks similar to those of stocks, such as market risk. Investing in ETFs may bear indirect fees and expenses charged by ETFs in addition to its direct fees and expenses, as well as indirectly bearing the principal risks of those ETFs. ETFs may trade at a discount to their net asset value and are subject to the market fluctuations of their underlying investments. Investing in commodities can be volatile and can suffer from periods of prolonged decline in value and may not be suitable for all investors. Index Performance is presented for illustrative purposes only and does not represent the performance of any specific investment product or portfolio. An investment cannot be made directly into an index.

Alternative Investments may have complex terms and features that are not easily understood and are not suitable for all investors. You should conduct your own due diligence to ensure you understand the features of the product before investing. Alternative investment strategies may employ a variety of hedging techniques and non-traditional instruments such as inverse and leveraged products. Certain hedging techniques include matched combinations that neutralize or offset individual risks such as merger arbitrage, long/short equity, convertible bond arbitrage and fixed-income arbitrage. Leveraged products are those that employ financial derivatives and debt to try to achieve a multiple (for example two or three times) of the return or inverse return of a stated index or benchmark over the course of a single day. Inverse products utilize short selling, derivatives trading, and other leveraged investment techniques, such as futures trading to achieve their objectives, mainly to track the inverse of their benchmarks. As with all investments, there is no assurance that any investment strategies will achieve their objectives or protect against losses.

Neither Envestnet, Envestnet|PMC™ nor its representatives render tax, accounting or legal advice. Any tax statements contained herein are not intended or written to be used, and cannot be used, for the purpose of avoiding U.S. federal, state, or local tax penalties. Taxpayers should always seek advice based on their own particular circumstances from an independent tax advisor.

© 2014 Envestnet. All rights reserved.

Featuring

Zachary Karabell
Head of Global Strategies, Envestnet, Inc., Consultant to Investment Committee*

Articles By This Author

Video: Taxes are certain, but don't obsess about tax reform Video: Time to stock up on growth or value? The Envestnet Edge, September 2017 Video: Time To Take A (Measured) Risk? The Envestnet Edge, July/August 2017 Video: Bitcoin: Buy Or Buyer Beware? The Envestnet Edge, June 2017 Video: FANG, FAAMG: Too Big a Bite of the Market? The Envestnet Edge, May 2017 Video: Invest "As If" The Envestnet Edge, April 2017 Video: What To Do In Quiet Markets The Envestnet Edge, March 2017 Video: Bull Or Bear: Should Investors Still Care? PMC Weekly Review - March 10, 2017 The Envestnet Edge, February 2017 Video: Separating markets from politics, is it really a "Trump rally"? The Envestnet Edge, January 2017 Video: Investing in Trump’s Economy? Proceed With Caution The Envestnet Edge, December 2016 Video: Have We Only Just Begun? The Envestnet Edge, November 2016 Video: Rotations, Reversals, Rising Rates: A Time to Reposition Post-Election, Will Markets and Portfolios Emerge Winners or Losers? Webinar Replay: Post-Election Winners and Losers The Envestnet Edge, October 2016 Video: In a 2-2-2 world, look for modest economic growth and expansion PMC Weekly Review - September 16, 2016 The Envestnet Edge, September 2016 Video: Diversification is working in 2016 (so far) The Envestnet Edge, July/August 2016 Video: Valuations: it's all relative Brexit: Plunging into the Unknown? The Envestnet Edge, June 2016 Video: Equity valuations and bond yields: reach no further PMC Weekly Review - June 17, 2016 The Envestnet Edge, May 2016 Video: Hitting singles: a measured approach for this investing season The Envestnet Edge, April 2016 Video: Investing with impact: increasingly a matter-of-fact Video: In this election cycle, will investors be winners or losers? The Envestnet Edge, March 2016 PMC Weekly Review - March 11, 2016 Video: In a low-growth world, less could be more The Envestnet Edge, February 2016 The Envestnet Edge, January 2016 Video: Markets are a mess, but don't jump to conclusions yet A Most Challenging Year Video: Interest Rates and Energy: The Highs and Lows of Year-End The Envestnet Edge, December 2015 The Envestnet Edge, November 2015 Video: We'll always have Paris The Envestnet Edge, October 2015 Video: Politics and the markets: déjà vu all over again? Video: China, Commodities, and Crisis: What's Next for Emerging Markets? The Envestnet Edge, September 2015 PMC Weekly Review - September 11, 2015 Is This The Big One (Financially Speaking)? Probably Not. The Envestnet Edge, August 2015 Video: In a "meh" market, look again at U.S. stocks The Envestnet Edge, July 2015 Video: Is this the Big One? What to do in a financial crisis Don't Worry About China Don’t Believe the Hype About Greece The Greek Catastrophe Is Finally Here (Unless It Isn’t) The Envestnet Edge, May/June 2015 Video: When Following the Herd is Risky, Where is the Safety? The Envestnet Edge, April 2015 Video: The End of Short-Termism is Long Overdue PMC Weekly Review - April 24, 2015 The Envestnet Edge, March 2015 Video: Keep Your Friends Close and Your Robo-Advisor Closer The Envestnet Edge, February 2015 Video: The Return of the Comeback: Is 2015 the Year for International Stocks? PMC Weekly Review - February 13, 2015 Why the Jobs Report Means Diddly Don’t Turn America Into Europe PMC Weekly Review - January 23, 2015 Video: Active and Passive: The Yin and Yang of Investing The Envestnet Edge, January 2015 PMC Weekly Review - January 9, 2015 Will Politics in 2015 Catch Up with the Economy? Video: Our Perspective on 2015: Maintain Yours The Envestnet Edge, December 2014 PMC Market Commentary: December 12, 2014 No, This Is NOT the '90s Economy Again PMC Market Commentary: November 14, 2014 Video: 2014 U.S. Midterms: A Win for Stocks? The Envestnet Edge, November 2014 Whose Economy Will It Be in 2016? PMC Market Commentary: October 17, 2014 Video: Special Video Commentary: Market Volatility and Fundamentals The Envestnet Edge, October 2014 Video: You Know What’s Not Sustainable? Ignoring the Opportunity in Impact Investing Don’t Panic! PMC Market Commentary: October 10, 2014 Greenberg’s Folly Naomi Klein Is Wrong PMC Market Commentary: September 26, 2014 Subprime Loans Are Back! Video: When it Comes to Interest Rates, Who Says What Comes Down Must Go Up? The Envestnet Edge, September 2014 PMC Market Commentary: September 12, 2014 Why Indie Bookstores Are on the Rise Again The Fed Is Not As Powerful As We Think PMC Market Commentary: August 22, 2014 Americans' Sour Mood on the Economy Doesn't Square with the Fact The Envestnet Edge, August 2014 Video: The World is in Crisis... the Markets are not PMC Market Commentary: August 8, 2014 PMC Market Commentary: July 25, 2014 Punitive Damages The Envestnet Edge, July 2014 Video: Market Valuations and The Theory of Relativity Don’t Kill the Export-Import Bank. Clone It. How India’s Economic Rise Could Bolster America’s Economy Video: Separating Risk from Reality PMC Market Commentary: June 27, 2014 No Sex Please, We're French PMC Market Commentary: June 13, 2014 The Envestnet Edge, June 2014 PMC Weekly Market Review, May 23, 2014 The Envestnet Edge, May 2014 Don't Bet on Rising Wages PMC Market Commentary: May 9, 2014 The Sharing Economy: Why Are So Many So Afraid? PMC Market Commentary: April 25, 2014 The Obsession with CEO Pay Won't Help the Middle Class PMC Market Commentary: April 11, 2014 Time to Face Reality: Our Unemployment Problems Are Structural PMC Market Commentary: March 28, 2014 In Defense of Relentless Optimism The "Made in China" Fallacy Forget GDP - Use Big Data